Tag Archives: Homelessness

What If the United States Became Less Federal and More Regional in Government? . by Alice B. Clagett

Written and published on 6 December 2019

Dear Ones,

I have some thoughts on the state of the nation. Intuitively, I sense economic stressors that may gradually lead to our Federal government taking a lesser role in the governance of the United States, compared to regional alliances of states. I see the Federal government continuing to provide military defense, social security payments, and leadership in foreign affairs. I also see states taking more initiative in economics for their regions.

As to trade, I see future reliance on established railroad routes and water routes such as the Mississippi river. I anticipate that, should there be a gradual lessening of Federal power, then there might be more trade within an economic region, and less trade globally and nationally.

As to finance, I see potential reliance on barter, with care no to place our financial assets in overseas locations. Local-employment based credit unions may come into favor as regional savings repositories.

There may be more reliance on those economic sectors that hold strong during recessions … such as locally grown food, locally obtainable building materials, and water supplies not piped in over long distances.

As to economic stressors, I suggest the economic impact of the HIV pandemic, stress of regional aridity due to long-distance water transport costs,

A socially disruptive stressor is handheld psychosis, which may lead to chaotic events such as mass murders and actions by public utilities and military regarding perceived dangers that do not truly exist. This might precipitate social unrest in regions of the United States pinpointed by the Jade Helm exercises.

In United States cities, the high cost of housing and the increasing phenomenon of homelessness may lead to social unrest and attempted land grabs through anarchist behavior; this is something for which, I feel, every large city mayor and every state government ought to have on hand emergency action plans. For states in arid regions, emergency anti-anarchist plans ought, I feel, to highlight security of water transport systems. Electrical grids, I feel, might also be an anarchist target.

We people in large United States cities can be of big help in creating peaceful environments for our children by offering our law enforcement departments volunteer help through neighborhood watch programs.

It seems unlikely to me that anything would happen in a moment; rather I feel that the United States might very slowly tend towards a model of government more akin to the state by state model of our early years as a nation. We may find, in future, that traveling from one state to the next is a refreshingly new experience. Not everyone may be watching the same thing on television every night anymore; there may be less airline flights from here to there; and so the natural flavor and local color of each region of the United States may become more striking to the casual tourist.

In addition, it may be that some regions of the United States may be more perilous for tourist travel, as was the case for travelers in the early years of our nation.

I realize the prospect of change can be unsettling. It is good to keep in mind that changes such as those spoken of above … if, indeed, change there be … would in all likelihood take place by slow stages, over the course of the next century or two. Thus I feel certain there would be plenty of time to make our plans and find our footing in the new.

Below are some maps I have adapted to show possible United States economic regions and trade regions of centuries to come. I would be interested on your comments regarding this intriguing topic of the eventual possibility that the United States government might become less centralized, and more imbued with local flavor and with the strong spirit of our local communities.

Image: HIV Pandemic Economic Stressor 1,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: To the right of the white line, One Eastern Economic Region including the Southern states and the Eastern Seaboard … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: HIV Pandemic Economic Stressor 1,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: To the right of the white line, One Eastern Economic Region including the Southern states and the Eastern Seaboard … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg  … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: HIV Pandemic Economic Stressor 2,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: To the right of the white line, the earlier Eastern Economic Region divided by the yellow line into two smaller regions: an Eastern Seaboard Region and a Southern Region, … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: HIV Pandemic Economic Stressor 2,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: To the right of the white line, the earlier Eastern Economic Region divided by the yellow line into two smaller regions: an Eastern Seaboard Region and a Southern Region,  … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg  … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Western Economic and Cultural Stressors,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: Along the Pacific Coast, two regions delineated by white lines. To the north is the Northwest Economic Region, including the parts of Washington state and Oregon with good rainfall. To the South is the California Central Valley Economic Region (also with good rainfall) … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Western Economic and Cultural Stressors,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: Along the Pacific Coast, two regions delineated by white lines. To the north is the Northwest Economic Region, including the parts of Washington state and Oregon with good rainfall. To the South is the California Central Valley Economic Region (also with good rainfall)  … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg  … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Jade Helm Stressors,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: Circled in yellow are two possible regions that might secede from the Union, but with which reciprocal trade agreements might be negotiated. Topmost is a Utah-Colorado Trade Region (which might be divided into two separate areas based on dominant religion). Lower and to the right is a Texas Trade Region comprising what is now eastern, central, and northern Texas. Then there are two southern regions delineated in white These are regions that might lean favorably towards alliance with Mexico, but with which we might anticipate establishing reciprocal trade agreements. To the left is a Mexican Trade Corridor comprising California from Los Angeles and to the south; the lower halves of Arizona and New Mexico, and the southwestern part of Texas. To the right is the state of Florida, which might lean favorably toward the Caribbean countries, but with which we might anticipate establishing reciprocal trade agreements … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Jade Helm Stressors,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: Circled in yellow are two possible regions that might secede from the Union, but with which reciprocal trade agreements might be negotiated. Topmost is a Utah-Colorado Trade Region (which might be divided into two separate areas based on dominant religion). Lower and to the right is a Texas Trade Region comprising what is now eastern, central, and northern Texas. Then there are two southern regions delineated in white These are regions that might lean favorably towards alliance with Mexico, but with which we might anticipate establishing reciprocal trade agreements. To the left is a Mexican Trade Corridor comprising California from Los Angeles and to the south; the lower halves of Arizona and New Mexico, and the southwestern part of Texas. To the right is the state of Florida, which might lean favorably toward the Caribbean countries, but with which we might anticipate establishing reciprocal trade agreements … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg  … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Southwestern Arid Region,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: Circled in white is the large Southwestern Arid Region, which might move to more local forms of small town government … as well as continuing with Native American Reservation governments … should the nation become less centralized. These include the Great Basin, the Great Rocky Mountains, and the western portion of the Great Plains … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Southwestern Arid Region,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: Circled in white is the large Southwestern Arid Region, which might move to more local forms of small town government … as well as continuing with Native American Reservation governments … should the nation become less centralized. These include the Great Basin, the Great Rocky Mountains, and the western portion of the Great Plains … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg  … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Central Breadbasket Region,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: Circled in green is a Central Breadbasket Region, with plentiful rainfall and good river transportation. This includes the eastern portion of the Great Plains, as well as the area south of the Great Lakes, west of the Appalachians, and north of the Southernmost states … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Central Breadbasket Region,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: Circled in green is a Central Breadbasket Region, with plentiful rainfall and good river transportation. This includes the eastern portion of the Great Plains, as well as the area south of the Great Lakes, west of the Appalachians, and north of the Southernmost states … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg  … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Future Capital Cities of the United States,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: The current capital of the United States is Washington DC (numbered ‘0’ on the map). Because of the AIDs crisis in Washington DC, and because our nation’s capital was once Lancaster PA, I suggest eventual relocation of the Capital back to Lancaster (numbered ‘1’ on the map). Farther out in time, it may be that Saint Louis, MO (labeled ‘2’) would prove a good location for our nation’s capital … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

Image: Future Capital Cities of the United States,” adapted by Alice B. Clagett, 6 December 2019, CC BY-SA 4.0 … DESCRIPTION: The current capital of the United States is Washington DC (numbered ‘0’ on the map). Because of the AIDs crisis in Washington DC, and because our nation’s capital was once Lancaster PA, I suggest eventual relocation of the Capital back to Lancaster (numbered ‘1’ on the map). Farther out in time, it may be that Saint Louis, MO (labeled ‘2’) would prove a good location for our nation’s capital … CREDIT: The topographic map is “USA topo en.jpg [USA Topographical Map], from Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USA_topo_en.jpg  … CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

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United States, government, economics, travels in the United States, history, geography, politics, social unrest, Jade Helm, community health, HIV pandemic, AIDS pandemic, homelessness,

Notes on Forestalling Social Unrest in California . by Alice B. Clagett *

Written on 12 April 2018; published on 6 December 2019

  • THOUGHTS ON PROVIDING STAGE ONE WORK FOR THE CALIFORNIA HOMELESS AT LESS THAN MINIMUM WAGE, IN EXCHANGE FOR SOCIAL SERVICES
    • Prison Work Programs for Less Than a Dollar an Hour
      • Prison Release Work Camps.
    • A Stage One Consideration in Employing California’s Homeless at Less Than the Minimum Wage
  • THOUGHTS ON SLOWING THE SPREAD OF HIV AND AIDS IN PRISONS
    • On Isolating HIV-Positive Prison Populations in Cell Blocks, Together with HIV-Positive Prison Guards
    • Conjugal Visits
  • HUMAN TRAFFICKING OF IMMIGRANTS TO THE UNITED STATES, COMPARED TO THAT IN CHINA
    • How China Deals with an Influx of Minimally Employable People from North Korea
    • How the United States Deals with an Influx of Minimally Employable People from Mexico
  • CONCLUSION

Dear Ones,

I wrote up these notes in April 2018, with a hope that I would soon finish them off. More than a year later, I have to figure I may never get round to that. I apologize to my reader that they are presented here in outline state …

THOUGHTS ON PROVIDING STAGE ONE WORK FOR THE CALIFORNIA HOMELESS AT LESS THAN MINIMUM WAGE, IN EXCHANGE FOR SOCIAL SERVICES

I have a thought that Stage One work might be provided the California homeless at less than minimum wage, in exchange for social services such as State One housing, necessary medical treatment, food, and temporary housing.

I note we have precedents in paying less than the minimum wage, here in America: Commission sales work, work on small farms, and newspaper delivery, for instance …

Link: “When Must Employers Pay the Minimum Wage?, updated by Sachi Barreiro, Attorney, at NOLO … https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/employers-pay-minimum-wage-law-29600.html ..

Prison Work Programs for Less Than a Dollar an Hour

Link: “How Much Do Incarcerated People Earn in Each State?” by Wendy Sawyer, 10 April 2017, in Prison Policy Initiative … https://www.prisonpolicy.org/blog/2017/04/10/wages/ ..

Thus we have a precedent, in the exceptional circumstance of incarceration, for offering work at a great deal less than the minimum wage. Could we build upon this precedent by offering work training to our felons or released felons or homeless, at far less than minimum wage?

If the precedent might be stretched in this way, then we might have the setting for an economic bounce-back, here in California, as greater numbers of the currently unemployed are able to find employment.

Prison Release Work Camps. I am thinking that something like this might be good if, for lack of funds, we have to release the prison population. For those who are ‘unregenerate’ … to use an old-time term … work camps might be set up or ‘rough and tumble’ work might be provided as an alternative to imprisonment, at greatly less than the minimum wage. This topic I discussed in a little more detail here …

Link: “Ought the United States, like North Korea, Have Forced Labor?” by Alice B. Clagett, published on 21 May 2019 … https://wp.me/p2Rkym-cQw ..

A Stage One Consideration in Employing California’s Homeless at Less Than the Minimum Wage

Here is a Stage One consideration: Let’s try to figure out some way to get around the minimum wage, for people who are unhomed, and who are receiving extra social services, in the event the United States government is not able to participate, here in California, in ameliorating the situation, and easing the social unrest.

For instance, could we offer something more akin to prison labor … voluntary labor, and a very small wage, in exchange for housing and food and medical care? Could we offer that, in camps especially set up for that?

What would be the long-term situation with regard to those that California cannot now find work for at minimum wage, and who must find work? If employment at less than minimum wage in exchange for social services were to be offered as a temporary, short-term Phase One, then what would be Phases Two and Three?

THOUGHTS ON SLOWING THE SPREAD OF HIV AND AIDS IN PRISONS

On Isolating HIV-Positive Prison Populations in Cell Blocks, Together with HIV-Positive Prison Guards

In United States prisons, HIV tests might be used to separate the HIV-positive prison populations … and the HIV-positive prison guards … physically, from those prisoners and guards who are HIV-negative. These tests need to be performed every 6 months, as I understand it, and also one month after possible exposure to the virus. HIV tests might be made routine in prison medical facilities, not only for the safety of prisoners and guards, but also for the sake of the infectible law-abiding populations upon whom prisoners might prey, either as prostitutes or as sexual predators, after their release.

Conjugal Visits

I think that, to prevent the spread of HIV and AIDS amongst United States prison populations, we ought to consider allowing conjugal or significant other visits in our federal prisons, and in those state prisons that currently do not do so.

Conjugal visits might lead to less intercourse amongst inmates, and less intercourse between inmates and prison guards, so that HIV might spread more slowly amongst the prison population. I feel that conjugal visits might also lead to less violence amongst prisoners.

Such a policy also might help prisoners who have been in long-time-paired relationships to preserve those relationships while imprisoned. It might help families stay together through the financial hardship of imprisonment of a parent, and that might positively affect community life.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING OF IMMIGRANTS TO THE UNITED STATES, COMPARED TO THAT IN CHINA

I have been perusing the “CIA World Factbook” online …

Link: “World Factbook,” by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) … https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/ ..

… and have found it full of information pertinent to forestalling social unrest in California. For instance, from my reading, it seems to me that the human trafficking of immigrants to China from North Korea in our lifetime is, in some ways, analogous to the human trafficking of immigrants to the United States from Mexico.

How China Deals with an Influx of Minimally Employable People from North Korea

Apparently, there are masses of people in North Korea, whom the government forces into forced labor in China …

“… North Korea does not fully comply with minimum standards for the elimination of [human] trafficking and is not making significant efforts to do so; the government continued to participate in human trafficking through its use of domestic forced labor camps and the provision of forced labor to foreign governments through bilateral contracts; officials did not demonstrate any efforts to address human trafficking through prosecution, protection, or prevention measures; no known investigations, prosecutions, or convictions of trafficking offenders or officials complicit in trafficking-related offenses were conducted; the government also made no efforts to identify or protect trafficking victims and did not permit NGOs to assist victims (2015) …” –from Link: “CIA World Factbook, North Korea,” in the section: Transnational Issues … Subheading: Trafficking in personshttps://www.cia.gov/library/publications/resources/the-world-factbook/geos/kn.html … public domain

Korean people also may flee to China of their own free will so as to escape starvation …

“… risking arrest, imprisonment, and deportation, tens of thousands of North Koreans cross into China to escape famine, economic privation, and political oppression … –from Link: “CIA World Factbook, North Korea,” in the section: Transnational Issues … subheading: Disputes – International https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/resources/the-world-factbook/geos/kn.html … public domain

Those types of labor available to trafficked peoples sometimes may be beneath the level of misery that is acceptable here in the United States …

Link: “Trafficking in Persons Report June 2017,” by United States of America Department of State … https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=801874This is a pdf download.

It might be prostitution. It might be illegal activities such as theft. It might be begging. They might be held by gangs that are ‘beneath the law’ and forced to be members of those gangs. This, to me, is unacceptable.

How the United States Deals with an Influx of Minimally Employable People from Mexico

The situation with immigrants from North Korean to China is analogous, in some regards, to the situation with immigrants from Mexico to the United States. Immigrants from Mexico are not forced by the United States government into inhumane kinds of labor, but they may find themselves in those kinds of situations … living In dug-out caves in the Earth, for instance. And doing seasonal, migrant labor. Or young women or children may find themselves forced into lives of prostitution by pimps.

One thing we might look at, going forward, is how job training might be offered new immigrants, here in the United States, so as to broaden the scope of job opportunities for which they are eligible. This type of job training is doubly beneficial: It helps raise the living standard of immigrants; and it helps lessen the spiritual burden of human trafficking in the United States and uplift our nation through good works in our community.

The philanthropy we offer those caught in the throes of human trafficking is a kindness we offer our children as well, for they will look forward to a better educated community through whose informed choices may be sculpted a brighter tomorrow for all America.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, I feel that Los Angeles in particular, due to such stressors as homelessness and released felons, faces the spectre of social unrest at present. What to do? I feel we must look at what other countries do when faced with these stressors. We must not turn away from innovative solutions simply because we feel they are beneath us, as Americans.

I feel it is because we feel this: that the lesser good we are able to provide the homeless and released felons is beneath us, and unworthy of them, that we have found ourselves for ten years to be in stalemate as a city.

We are unable to provide the level of benefits and care that has been, with hopeful optimism, voted into California law. Massive problems lie before us, and have done so for 10 years now. California is a Sanctuary State for those fleeing from downright extermination in the crueler states of our great Union.

Though we are that to many, we have not the funds to help those seeking sanctuary in the manner afforded the homeless, the helpless, those seeking shelter, food, and work in days of old.

Here in Los Angeles we must make bold to provide what we may to those who have nothing at all. Though it be against the laws of our nation, and against those of our State, we must do what we can. We must offer what we may. We must open our hearts, still our doubts, and come up with sensible, novel solutions to the new problems that lie before us.

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

Video: “Everyone In–Supportive Housing Across L.A.,” by Everyone In LA, 8 March 2018 …  https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=22&v=QnZWabk8mO0 ..

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California economy, social unrest, law enforcement, human rights, forced labor, homeless, jobless, homelessness, joblessness, felons, prisons, rehabilitation, HIV, AIDS, prostitution, illegal occupations, work camps, drinking water, housing, favelas, alternative housing, Mexican-United States relations, immigrant workers, illegal immigrants, addiction, SSI, economics, social issues, human trafficking, Chinese forced labor, North Korean forced labor, prison labor, community service, home detention, work release,  work furlough, HIV pandemic, AIDS, my favorites, restorative justice, imprisonment, United States, Mexico, North Korea, China, safety, countries of Earth, Los Angeles, California,

Homed Who Live Next to Homeless Encampments in Los Angeles . by Alice B. Clagett

Published on 11 September 2019

Dear Ones,

It seems to me there is concern for personal safety among homeowners and their families who live next to homeless encampments in Los Angeles. On mulling over this issue, I came to understand the depth of despair of fathers and husbands who have invested their life savings in providing homes for their families, and whose wives and children can no longer safely leave home at night, because of homeless encampments on their sidewalks or in treed or grassy areas nearby.

It occurred to me that passive defense systems might offer an alternative to taking the law into one’s own hands on behalf of family safety. Along these lines, I thought homeowners might consider installing floodlights that illuminate terrain between them and the homeless encampments at night, so that their families could feel safe to walk out of their houses. I also wonder if high fences around homeowners’ yards might help.

Housing codes regarding the height of property fences can cause trouble with safety in these times, as those who wrote the codes could not have foreseen the current difficulty. Maybe property fencing codes could be got round by using temporary construction fencing in the yard? Maybe it might be sensible to go ahead and put up high fences around the home, with the agreement of one’s neighbors, since getting the codes changed may take some time.

In addition, I thought, it might be possible to install perimeter electronic alarms, that would provide a warning if the yard is trespassed on? Maybe others will come up with passive defense systems for homed families as well.

I know it is not fair to think about putting walls up and protecting our homes. It’s not something we have ever had to do before. Why should we have to do it now? Why should we go to the expense? Why does not the City of Los Angeles just fix the problem? It seems to me that is what folks are wondering, and I have been wondering that too.

Finally it came to me that the City of Los Angeles may not have a solution for us. They may not have the staff, the financial resources, or the flexible problem-solving ability to deal with the question. I say that because the problem has been before LA for 10 years now, and the City has not come up with a solution.

It seems to me that we Los Angeles homeowners must come up with our own solutions. But what will those solutions be? Some feel angry; they feel like hurting the homeless. Others feel afraid; again and again, they ask the Los Angeles Police Department to remove the homeless from their block.

I myself feel that we ought to do my best to find physical deterrents, such as high fences, perimeter alarm systems, and camera surveillance systems to protect our homes from the unhomed, and from roaming felon gangs.

When our homes are as protected as possible, we can feel safe to continue to work with our communities towards good solutions.

I recently went to a meeting of the West Hills Neighborhood Council Committee on Homelessness. It seemed to me they work with the office of the Mayor in a political way. The political approach involves jockeying with the powers that be for application of the City’s very limited financial resources to a problem for which we are lobbying, in our own interests.

Politicking takes time. More than 10 years … that is patently clear. I feel we need to find other grassroots ways to solve this problem.

Right now, I am thinking we could approach West Hills churches, civic groups, clubs, and businesses we belong to or patronize, and ask them what they can do to help. Could be we the people can together find a solution to the problem of West Hills homelessness … a solution that so far has eluded City Hall.

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

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Except where otherwise noted, “Awakening with Planet Earth” by Alice B. Clagett … https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com … is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0) … https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ ..

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community health, Los Angeles, West Hills, homelessness, safety, law enforcement, protection, crime prevention, survival, sustainable living, politics, West Hills Neighborhood Council,

Community Health: Homed Who Live Next to Homeless Encampments . by Alice B. Clagett

Published on 17 August 2019

Dear Ones,

As you may know, California is a Sanctuary State for the nation’s homeless. Here in Los Angeles, there are 50,000 to 60,000 homeless people. Homeless encampments, though small, are a prevalent feature of the urban landscape. In addition, there are homeless communities in the mountains, which pose an issue of possible fire during our annual fire seasons.

For some years now I have been active in Neighborhood Watch in my neighborhood, and also keep abreast of my larger neighborhood through NextDoor … https://nextdoor.com/ … Lately, I have begun attending local monthly Neighborhood Council and Topanga Los Angeles Police Department community meetings as well. These have helped me get a better grasp of the problems our city faces.

It seems to me there is concern for personal safety among homeowners and their families who live next to homeless encampments in Los Angeles. On mulling over this issue, I came to understand the depth of despair of fathers and husbands who have invested their life savings in providing homes for their families, and whose wives and children can no longer safely leave home at night, because of homeless encampments on their sidewalks or in treed or grassy areas nearby.

It occurred to me that passive defense systems might offer an alternative to taking the law into one’s own hands on behalf of family safety.

Along these lines, I thought homeowners might consider installing floodlights that illuminate terrain between them and the homeless encampments at night, so that their families could feel safe to walk out of their houses. I also wonder if high fences around homeowners’ yards might help.

Housing codes regarding the height of property fences can cause trouble with safety in these times, as those who wrote the codes could not have foreseen the current difficulty. Maybe property fencing codes could be got round by using temporary construction fencing in the yard? Maybe it might be sensible to go ahead and put up high fences around the home, with the agreement of one’s neighbors, since getting the codes changed may take some time.

In addition, I thought, it might be possible to install perimeter electronic alarms, that would provide a warning if the yard is trespassed on?

My hope is that others will come up with thoughts on passive defense systems for homed families as well.

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

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homelessness, community health, safety, crime, Los Angeles, despair, protection, crime prevention, courage,

How to Greet People in Los Angeles . by Alice B. Clagett

Filmed on 25 December 2018; published on 16 June 2019

Dear Ones,

Here is a video about the protocol on greeting people in Los Angeles supermarkets. There is a lightly edited Summary after the video …

VIDEO BY ALICE

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO

Hello, Dear Ones, It’s Alice. I Am of the Stars.

A little while ago I explained the code word, the code language, for greeting someone in a car if you are in the Colorado area … the way to vet yourself is a Coloradan …

Link: “Transforming a Projected Body Elemental with Love,” by Alice B. Clagett, filmed on 1 September 2018; published on 6 September 2015; transcribed on 21 December 2018 … https://wp.me/p2Rkym-534 ..

But I thought it also might be best to provide some information for those Coloradans who want to visit Los Angeles, so that they will know how to greet people too. It is very different here. The most important thing to know about visiting Los Angeles is: Never look anyone in the eye, if you are passing them by, or if you are in the store. Whatever you do, avoid eye contact.

The results of failing to do this are pretty severe. People figure either you are homeless and on the dole … looking for a handout … or else you’re a psychopath after injuring them or doing them some harm. So be very careful, in walking the streets of Los Angeles, never to look anyone in the eye.

The exception is young children; they have not yet learned these rules. And so it is quite a joy to greet young children just about anywhere in the world. Now you know the answer. Remember, not like this …

Image: “Direct Eye Contact,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 December 2018, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Direct Eye Contact,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 December 2018, CC BY-SA 4.0

… like that …

Image: “Avoiding Eye Contact,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 December 2018, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Avoiding Eye Contact,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 December 2018, CC BY-SA 4.0

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

Image: “Smile,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 December 2018, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Smile,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 December 2018, CC BY-SA 4.0

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Except where otherwise noted, “Awakening with Planet Earth” by Alice B. Clagett … https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com … is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0) … https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ ..

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greetings, social customs, Los Angeles, antisocial personality, beggar, homelessness, social contracts,

Ground Zero: How Will an Insolvent California House Its Homeless? . by Alice B. Clagett

Published on 21  May 2019

  • WHAT IS CALIFORNIA REALISTICALLY ABLE TO PROVIDE ITS HOMELESS RIGHT NOW?
    • Favelas as Housing?
    • Cardboard Packing Crate, or Old Tire Housing
    • Free Zone with Offer of Landfill Building Materials
  • CONCLUSION

Dear Ones,

It is possible that the slow roll of the HIV – AIDS pandemic will provide relief from the California housing crisis over time, by slowing or halting population growth over the next 10 or 20 years. But in the meantime, we have a homeless problem that is impossible to solve, using the current measuring stick for adequate housing, because the solutions put forth are too costly, considering the state of the California budget.

Have we not done next to nothing for some years now, because we have not the money on hand to live up to our expectations in housing the homeless? And in the meantime, they are suffering and dying on our streets, right beneath our gaze.

Clearly, we must give up our grand expectations, and find what we are able to do, and do that … even if it be the humblest gesture … right now. Let us start from what we are able to do, rather than what we think we ought to do … And provide some form of housing, no matter how humble, for our unhoused population.

WHAT IS CALIFORNIA REALISTICALLY ABLE TO PROVIDE ITS HOMELESS RIGHT NOW?

Considering the harsh reality of the existence of an uncountable number of Californians housed in the dirt, and working in the earth: What can we do right now, starting from ground zero, to improve that situation? We might look at what other countries too poor to help their indigent in a grand way yet may offer as Stage One housing.

Favelas as Housing? For instance, at the very least, can we provide for our homeless land set aside for a favela-type existence, as is available in the poor sectors of Brazilian cities?

Image: “The favelas of Niteroi, Brazil – March 2011,” https://i.pinimg.com/736x/78/b4/02/78b402c949b17c32daacd2918c6ff2db–favelas-brazil.jpg ..

Cardboard Packing Crate, or Old Tire Housing. If cardboard, packing crate, or old-tire housing works for the unhomed in Tijuana, maybe we could provide that type of housing here …

Image: “Tijuana Houses: Slums and City,” https://i.pinimg.com/originals/aa/2a/b2/aa2ab250bc938f04d2da53d11c090dac.jpg ..

Free Zone with Offer of Landfill Building Materials. Are we able to rummage through our landfills, and find building materials that they can use? Is this a possibility?

Might we establish a free zone, where they can build and squat? And might we haul in building materials from our dumps so that they can use them?

CONCLUSION

This I see as an urgently necessary in the solution of the homeless dilemma: To find the homeless a safe place to be, no matter how humble. We must start where we are, and do what we can, even if it be no more than that which the underdeveloped nations are able to provide their homeless and indigent populations.

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

Video: “Everyone In–Supportive Housing Across L.A.,” by Everyone In LA, 3 March 2018, https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=22&v=QnZWabk8mO0 ..

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Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
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California homelessness, homelessness, community health, underdeveloped nations, social issues, alternative housing, favelas, recycled building materials,

Drinking Water for the California Homeless: Private Water Sellers?

Published on 21 May 2019

Dear Ones,

Partly because the water crisis in California is causing there to be less of the landscaping water the California homeless have been using as drinking water, there is in California today an urgent issue of providing potable drinking water for the homeless, and forthe indigent. This is like the issue of drinking water faced in India …

Link: “Why Informal Water Sellers Are Key to India’s Future,” by Kavitha Rajagopalan, 28 December 2015 … https://www.citylab.com/life/2015/12/why-informal-water-sellers-are-key-to-indias-future/421950/ ..

Maybe here in the United States, as in India, private water sellers could step in, and provide inexpensive drinking water for those in desperate need of it? Perhaps this would be a new job category for those who need work: that of private water seller. Employment in that category might ease the burden of unemployment here in California.

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

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Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Except where otherwise noted, “Awakening with Planet Earth” by Alice B. Clagett … https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com … is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0) … https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ ..

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California water, homelessness, community health, private water sellers, employment, economy, India,