Qualities of Satan According to the Bible: 4.8 Accuser of the Brethren . channeled by Alice B. Clagett

Written and published on 10 October 2013; updated with images, text and videos during October 2021-January 2022; republished as a separate blog on 24 December 2021
Biblical references (if there are any) are in light blue font.

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  • VIDEO BY ALICE
  • SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO
    • Revelation 12:10

Dear Ones,

This is subsection 4.8 “Accuser of the Brethren,” of the section “4.0 Qualities of Satan According to the Bible,” from the video series “Satan’s Powers and What to Do About Them,” by Alice B. Clagett. There is an edited Summary after the video …

VIDEO BY ALICE

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO

Hello, Dear Ones, It’s Alice. I Am of the Stars.

I have for you today subsection 4.8 of the video series “Satan’s Powers and What to Do About Them,” by Alice B. Clagett. Subsection 4.8 is entitled “Accuser of the Brethren.”

Revelation 12:10 (KJV, public domain)

This term “Accuser of the Brethren” is used for Satan in Revelation 12:10 …

10 “And I heard a loud voice saying in heaven, Now is come salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God, and the power of his Christ: for the accuser of our brethren is cast down, which accused them before our God day and night.

I am guessing this attribute of Satan, ‘Accuser of the Brethren’, has to do with persecution of those with a high Light quotient … for instance, Lightworkers, Spirit-filled Christians, and those kinds of people. Truthfully, though, it is not persecution. It is actually an opportunity for each of us to transform Darkness to Light, through loving Awareness.

[Sound of ravens cawing with harsh voices.] It is interesting that we are hearing these ravens with the very harsh voices right now … very unusual tone of voice and way of speaking, for ravens. They sound rough and cruel, do they not? … along with the occasional ‘caw, caw’ of a regular raven.

The voices of the ravens today remind me a little of this name for Satan … ‘Accuser of the Brethren’. It sounds like these ravens are accusing, or attacking, or condemning me. You should have been here when I first sat under this huge oak tree. I sat down, and I adjusted the camcorder, and then the ravens started up. It was very spooky. There was one over here [points left and to the front] and another over there [points back and to the right] calling and answering each other, and making a really loud, attacking sound. It is apt, today, to hear the ravens doing this. The sound that they are making reminds me of this attribute of Satan.

. . . . .

I have two images for you today. The first is called “The False Witnesses,” by James Tissot, between 1886 and 1894, and it is from Wikimedia Commons. It may be a little hard for you to see, because it is a dark image. It is a picture of all kinds of men in a high state of anger … jeering and shouting and raising their hands … all aimed in the same direction, probably during a trial. Can you see them? They seem to be a mob of angry men.

My Comment on the image is below …

Image: “The False Witnesses,” by James Tissot, between 1886 and 1894, in Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brooklyn_Museum_-_The_False_Witnesses_(Les_faux_t%C3%A9moins)_-_James_Tissot.jpg … public domain … COMMENT: My feeling is that people who bear false witness, and most especially those who engage in ‘character assassination’ for reasons of business profit, jealousy, or revenge, may have been tempted by Satan to be involved in this action. I read once in a Christian treatise that the author felt gossip and calumny to be mortal sins. I feel he said this because of the great test of faith the victim of false witness must endure. It is even possible that false witness may cause an innocent person … whether a man, a woman or a child … to be prevented from attending church and receiving the sacraments. That must surely be a great evil for the instigator of false witness to bear. Christ stood with great dignity before his false accusers, though he knew it would surely mean His death. So must we who may be maligned stand, with faith in God, through all adversity.

Image: “The False Witnesses,” by James Tissot, between 1886 and 1894, in Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brooklyn_Museum_-_The_False_Witnesses_(Les_faux_t%C3%A9moins)_-_James_Tissot.jpg … public domain …

COMMENT: My feeling is that people who bear false witness, and most especially those who engage in ‘character assassination’ for reasons of business profit, jealousy, or revenge, may have been tempted by Satan to be involved in this action. I read once in a Christian treatise that the author felt gossip and calumny to be mortal sins. I feel he said this because of the great test of faith the victim of false witness must endure.

It is even possible that false witness may cause an innocent person … whether a man, a woman or a child … to be prevented from attending church and receiving the sacraments. That must surely be a great evil for the instigator of false witness to bear. Christ stood with great dignity before his false accusers, though he knew it would surely mean His death. So must we who may be maligned stand, with faith in God, through all adversity.

. . . . .

I have one more image for you. The title is “Calumny of Apelles” by Sandro Botticelli, between about 1496 and about 1497, in Wikimedia Commons, so it is public domain in this case. This is an allegorical painting. There are a number of characters in this allegory. It is a rather lively scene.

My eye is caught especially by the woman in red in the center [of the image], but there are a number of other important characters in this allegory that I will explain to you one by one.

A lengthy Description of the image and my Comments on the image are below …

Image: “Calumny of Apelles,” by Sandro Botticelli, between circa 1496 and circa 1497, in Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sandro_Botticelli_021.jpg … public domain … DESCRIPTION: “Botticelli made this painting on the description of a painting by Apelles, a Greek painter of the Hellenistic period. Apelles’ works have not survived, but Lucian recorded details of one in his ‘On Calumny’: ‘On the right of it sits Midas with very large ears, extending his hand to Slander while she is still at some distance from him. Near him, on one side, stand two women—Ignorance and Suspicion. On the other side, Slander is coming up, a woman beautiful beyond measure, but full of malignant passion and excitement, evincing as she does fury and wrath by carrying in her left hand a blazing torch and with the other dragging by the hair a young man who stretches out his hands to heaven and calls the gods to witness his innocence. She is conducted by a pale ugly man who has a piercing eye and looks as if he had wasted away in long illness; he represents Envy. There are two women in attendance to Slander, one is Fraud and the other Conspiracy. They are followed by a woman dressed in deep mourning, with black clothes all in tatters—she is Repentance. At all events, she is turning back with tears in her eyes and casting a stealthy glance, full of shame, at Truth, who is slowly approaching.’”… COMMENT: What a wonderful allegorical painting this is, depicting as it does all the major players in the upsets of life on Earth: Greed (in the person of Midas), Slander, Ignorance, Suspicion, Envy, Fraud, Conspiracy, Repentance, and Truth. That is quite a concatenation of calamity, do you not agree? How beautiful Slander is, and how likely to win the ear of a willing Midas? How long shall it be till Truth be heard?

Image: “Calumny of Apelles,” by Sandro Botticelli, between circa 1496 and circa 1497, in Wikimedia Commons … https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sandro_Botticelli_021.jpg … public domain …

DESCRIPTION: “Botticelli made this painting on the description of a painting by Apelles, a Greek painter of the Hellenistic period. Apelles’ works have not survived, but Lucian recorded details of one in his ‘On Calumny’: ‘On the right of it sits Midas with very large ears, extending his hand to Slander while she is still at some distance from him. Near him, on one side, stand two women—Ignorance and Suspicion.

On the other side, Slander is coming up, a woman beautiful beyond measure, but full of malignant passion and excitement, evincing as she does fury and wrath by carrying in her left hand a blazing torch and with the other dragging by the hair a young man who stretches out his hands to heaven and calls the gods to witness his innocence. She is conducted by a pale ugly man who has a piercing eye and looks as if he had wasted away in long illness; he represents Envy. There are two women in attendance to Slander, one is Fraud and the other Conspiracy.

They are followed by a woman dressed in deep mourning, with black clothes all in tatters—she is Repentance. At all events, she is turning back with tears in her eyes and casting a stealthy glance, full of shame, at Truth, who is slowly approaching.” …

COMMENT: What a wonderful allegorical painting this is, depicting as it does all the major players in the upsets of life on Earth: Greed (in the person of Midas), Slander, Ignorance, Suspicion, Envy, Fraud, Conspiracy, Repentance, and Truth. That is quite a concatenation of calamity, do you not agree? How beautiful Slander is, and how likely to win the ear of a willing Midas? How long shall it be till Truth be heard?

. . . . .

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

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Satan, Demonic Realm, demons, devils, negative astral beings, Christianity, Lightworkers, Ascension,

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