Tag Archives: photo essay

Bell Rock – Coronal Mass Ejection – Feelings of Mental and Emotional Pressure – as if Being Born . by Alice B. Clagett

Filmed on 28 July 2013; published on 5 September 2014; revised and republished on 28 December 2017

  • VIDEO BY ALICE
  • SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO
    • Postlude: Music of Chris Zabriskie and Natural Scenes

Dear Ones,

Here is a video about the energies at Bell Rock, an incoming coronal mass ejection (CME), feelings of emotional and mental pressure, and being born! The Postlude at the end of the video features the music of Chris Zabriskie. There is an edited Summary after the video…

VIDEO BY ALICE

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO

Hello, Dear Ones, It’s Alice.

I am here at Bell Rock, Sedona, Arizona, and I thought I would show you what is happening here. Just a minute … So, this is Bell Rock … See that huge structure there?

Image: “Bell Rock,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0

Image: “Bell Rock,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0 

And then there is a dip, and kind of a ‘valley’ in the rocks …

Image: “Saddle Between Bell Rock and Courthouse Butte,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0

Image: “Saddle Between Bell Rock and Courthouse Butte,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0 

See, there is another peak far off there …

Image: “Far Mesa at Saddle Between Bell Rock and Courthouse Butte,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0

Image: “Far Mesa at Saddle Between Bell Rock and Courthouse Butte,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0 

So there’s this valley here, that gets even lower, and then comes down to the place where I’m sitting.

And over here, there’s another huge rock … Courthouse Butte …

Image: “Courthouse Butte,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0

Image: “Courthouse Butte,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0 

And so, I thought I would talk a little about the energy that is right here, coming in towards me, from the dip between the mountains. [Shows sunshine over brim of hat.] Nice effect, huh?

Image: “Sun Over My Hat at Bell Rock,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0

Image: “Sun Over My Hat at Bell Rock,” by Alice B. Clagett, 5 September 2014, CC BY 4.0 

So, there is energy flowing, like a cool breeze, through that dip in the rock. And it is coming this way. And then it settles down, like the evening coolness, down onto the Earth right where I am.

And the feeling that I get, is that this incoming energy that we have right now, is like this place where I am right now. It is as if we were in a birth canal. In a narrow place, with a lot of pressure.

And so, the thing I would like to say is that, the moment before birth, the most pressure is on. And it seems like an untenable position … you know? … to us being born. The same is true of the energy coming in tonight, and even starting right now: There’s a lot of pressure, and it kind of feels difficult. Really, really hard … Impossible!

But the thing to remember is: In just a minute now, we will be born onto New Earth completely. The process of birth will be finished. And the pressure will be off.

Postlude: Music of Chris Zabriskie and Natural Scenes

[The gentle instrumental music in the Postlude is “Prelude No. 6” from the album “Preludes” by Chris Zabriskie, CC BY 4.0]

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars
…………………..

Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
…………………………………………………….
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anxiety, astrogeophysics, being born, Bell Rock, CME, coronal mass ejection, emotional and mental pressure, New Earth, Sedona vortex energy, Chris Zabriskie, photo essay,

Rainmaking . by Alice B. Clagett

Filmed on 6 May 2016 and 7 May 2016; published on 22 May 2016

  • VIDEO BY ALICE: RAINMAKING 1, 6 May 2016
  • SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO
    • My recent experiences with rainmaking.
    • Would men like to perform rainmaking ceremonies, perhaps?
    • Importance of visualizing precise results: where should the rain fall, how many inches of rain should fall, how many days of rain should there be, what about runoff, what areas and outcomes (such as mudslides and flooding) need to be avoided?
    • How unconscious thoughts, fears and worries can prevent rainfall.
    • What manzanita, a chaparral plant, looks like when its stressed by drought.
  • VIDEO BY ALICE: RAINMAKING 2, 7 May 2016
  • SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO
    • The next day: Signs that it has rained at Chatsworth Reservoir and Sage Ranch in the Los Angeles area
    • How the nature elementals make rain: water elementals (undines) care for the water and air elementals (sylphs and zephyrs) carry the water up to the clouds and round to where the rain must fall
    • What would happen if 10 people in Los Angeles visualized rain when needed?
  • SIGNS OF RAINFALL AT CHATSWORTH NATURE PRESERVE

Dear Ones,

Here are two videos on Rainmaking. There is an edited Summary beneath each video …

VIDEO BY ALICE: RAINMAKING 1
Filmed on 6 May 2016; published on 22 May 2016

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO

Hello, Dear Ones, It’s Alice. I Am of the Stars.

I just wanted to explain a little to you about rainmaking today, and also about what happened last night and today about the rain.

Yesterday I went for a Sierra Club hike along the trails up Stunt Road to Saddleback Mountain. What we saw was many stressed chaparral plants, that were in trouble because they needed more rain. In a minute, I will show you a picture of those: How it looks, and how you can tell.

While I was on the trail, I took what spare water I had, on the way down, and I watered two chaparral plants that looked like they really needed it, with the remaining water that I had. And then, when I got home, I was thinking about the plants.

Now trees are something that I really love; I have loved them all my life. It means a lot to me that the trees in this area, and all over Earth, should be very healthy. So I got to thinking how I had had success, in the past, with rainmaking. That was yesterday afternoon. And I was talking, on the clair plane, with the lady down the hill, about it.

So I just said to myself: Ok, I will just ask for rain right now. I will ask the nature world and the devas to bring us rain, all over the county of Los Angeles. I would like four inches of rain; steady, gentle rain, followed by intervals when the water could sink into the Earth, with optimal amounts of water draining off the land, so that most of the water sinks in. And so: All over the County of Los Angeles, four inches of rain.

And I put forth that request, that that should be happening. So this morning I woke up, and right about mid-morning I woke up. And I was very surprised; here in sunny California there was a gigantic rain cloud over the Santa Susana Mountains, right across from where I live, across from the Chatsworth Nature Preserve.

While I was looking, it started raining all over the Santa Susana Mountains, and the lady who lives down the hill noticed too. She got very excited about it, and she said: Bring that rain cloud over here! I would like to have rain over here as well!

And I said: Well, you know, you could have rain both places. Let’s ask for rain everywhere where it needs to be ... So she did.

Five or ten minutes later, the rain cloud came over to my place and her place, and started raining very gently over there. It was time for me to go get some lunch and to go to a particular movie I wanted to see. So I took off in my car, and be darned if the rain cloud did not follow me, because I love rain, right? That’s what I think!

When I went in to get the food, it was raining steadily. And when I went out to go to the movie, it was raining steadily there, in that place. And when I came out, it was still raining a little. It was great!

So then I thought I would go check Saddleback Peak area, because I had explained to the nature spirits, in great detail, about how to get there, and how the chaparral trees really needed the rain right now.

And the nature spirits were so funny; they were really incredibly enthusiastic. They went: Wow! Let’s go see what that looks like right now! Let’s go explore! … And they went off and looked at that.

And I said: Don’t forget the red shanks over there; they need it too.

And they said: Woo, let’s go look at that!

And so that was a lot of fun. It was a medium-sized rain cloud; I was hoping that they could come here [to Saddleback Peak] too.

While I was going out, I heard from the Native Americans on the clair plane. They are very interested in rainmaking. They usually do not speak, except among themselves, on the clair plane, but today they did mention something; they said it would be better for us to get together our men, because men have a lot of power in asking for rain. They can do a rain dance, and they can ask for rain.

I said: How is that, that they have more power?

And they said: Well, they stomp on the ground! … and I think they said: At the end, they raise their arms up high, and they ask for rain!

So I thought: Gosh, maybe a neighborhood event; who knows? … Neighborhood Watch … a rain gathering; a rainmaking session.

I will see if I can interest anyone in that. And I hope that you might be interested too. You could find out the true technique for doing it, and you could pursue that … because the nature elementals, the spirits of the air and the water are very responsive to human thought, to human requests, and to human enthusiasm about rain and wind and weather … all kind s of things. So you have to be very specific; you have to say what it is that you really want. And they are so enthusiastic about responding.

Today was just an incredible day; they were going on and on, and I was too. So I came here. To sum it all up, I came to the place where I was yesterday on an eight-mile hike with quite a bit of elevation gain for recent days. And I found what I will show you right here …

First, as I was coming up, I noticed the rain clouds coming up, over the far horizon, out towards Santa Barbara …

Image: “Rain Making 1,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 1,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And then I got up to the peak, and I noticed this big rain cloud here …

Image: “Rain Making 2,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 2,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And there was rain; you can still see a little bit of the rain on the windshield here …

Image: “Rain Making 3,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 3,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And there was misty rain coming over the mountains. You see that mist? The chaparral plants absorb that mist as water sometimes; that is their water intake. So they are drinking that water right now.

And then, down all across this region, down there …

Image: “Rain Making 4,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 4,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… I saw rain clouds everywhere, and rain everywhere. Look over there; look down there …

Image: “Rain Making 5,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 5,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

See that rain? Look at all that! Rain everywhere. Wow!

So here is the thing: If you want rain, you have to ask for rain. You have to say what kind of rain you want; how long you want it to last; how many inches; for how many days … And you have to be very specific and very upbeat.

Know that you have this power. You have this power, and you have a right to speak what your will is, in the world, for the weather of Earth.

I had one conversation on the psychic plane today that is well worth repeating. I hope no one is embarrassed about it. In addition to the Sierra Club, I am also a member of the California Native Plant Society, And that society is the caretaker for a nature preserve that goes through a riparian area, high up the mountain, into the red shank, right here on the other side of what I just showed you … on the right, here. And that place is called Cold Creek Preserve.

There is a path in the preserve that goes by a cliff that keeps crumbling, and so it is difficult to maintain the path. And what I found out is that there are some people that care about the Cold Creek Preserve, who are preventing the rain from coming there by simple thought process that, if the rain comes, then there is a chance that the cliff will collapse onto the pathway, and they will not be able to walk through again.

If you have concerns of this nature, the important thing to do is to visualize the rain that your concerned area of the world needs, and specify those places where the rain should be a little less, or maybe not even happen … such as that little cliff area … so that everything else can be watered; because it is very important for the plants and animals, and even the rocks in the mountains, and in the valleys, and by the seas, and along the coastal scrub … everywhere … that it should have just the right amount of water to flourish.

We can do that. But by our unconscious thoughts and fears and concerns, we can prevent the area, too, from getting the rainfall that it needs.

I would like to encourage each of you to start your own raindance, and your own rain thoughts, and to develop your own rainmaking ability, with crisply delineated parameters. And, get to know your nature spirits and your nature elementals, and your devas! Devas are cool!

. . . . .

Well, now I am taking another survey of the rain here, near Stunt Mountain and Cold Creek Preserve, and I see a promising sight off over this way …

Image: “Rain Making 6,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 6,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Back in those far mountains there is rain in the air, and there may be rain actually coming down on the land over there. Then there is a chance of rain over this way …

Image: “Rain Making 7,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 7,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… there is this giant mountain with a fire road [Calabasas Peak Motorway] that goes up it, You can walk up that fire road, and then turn right half way, or two-thirds of the way up the mountain [onto West Red Rock Road] and go down into Red Rock Canyon Park on the other side … up this mountain here; see that road? …

Image: “Rain Making 8: Saddleback Peak and Calabasas Peak Motorway,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 8: Saddleback Peak and Calabasas Peak Motorway,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It is pretty foreboding, but there are beautiful views, and a wonderful workout. Then over this way, it looks to me like, off in the far distance, there is a chance of rain actually coming down out of the clouds; not half way down, but the whole way down, and hitting those mountains over there …

Image: “Rain Making 9,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 9,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Back over here to the left, the cloud of rain has moved quickly, in this direction, and it is raining more here towards us, closer to us and closer to the big mountain with the fire road on it …

Image: “Rain Making 10,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 10,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Higher up, at the top of the mountain here, where three roads [Stunt Road, Schueren Road, and Saddle Peak Road] meet, I noticed that there had been rain, because the sides of the road were a little bit wet and pretty muddy …

Image: “Rain Making 11: Stunt Road,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 11: Stunt Road,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

On the top of the mountain there, the thing of it is that the airs from the ocean hit the mountain here and cause more precipitation, and also more mistfall through the mountains. And so it is more likely to get rain than this area where I am walking right now … which is, unfortunately, I have to say, way too dry. See there? … too sandy dry …

Image: “Rain Making 12: Dusty Ground,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 12: Dusty Ground,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

I am going to check out the trees right now, specifically the manzanita trees, because they are one of my most beautiful favorites, and I am very concerned about them, although all the trees are worth looking at and figuring out about.

Here I am entering one of the trails next to Cold Creek Preserve, but not on the one we walked up and down yesterday …

Image: “Rain Making 13,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 13,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And this trail contains some excellent examples of stressed chaparral shrubs. My favorite, right here, is the manzanita tree or shrub (Arctostaphylos)

Image: “Rain Making 14: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 14: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

I think it must be a relative of the Pacific madrone (Ericaceae) tree on the far northern coast of California, that grows to such beautiful height, and has such beautiful red bark like this shrub …

Image: “Rain Making 15: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 15: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And so I am pretty sure they are related, but I do not know for certain. They look a lot alike. And then the leaves typically look like this when the tree is not stressed …

Image: “Rain Making 16: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 16: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

But this tree is stressed for lack of water. And so some of the leaves have turned yellow …

Image: “Rain Making 17: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 17: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And over here too, you will see lots more yellow leaves. See there?  …

Image: “Rain Making 18: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 18: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And then over here, after the leaves turn yellow, sometimes they actually die. And here is a case of leaves that have died back, because the plant cannot support them because of lack of water.

Image: “Rain Making 19: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 19: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

All right, so here we have, on the same trail, a very stressed manzanita plant. Not only are the leaves all speckled … some yellow, some brown, and some green …

Image: “Rain Making 20: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 20: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… but down here at the bottom we have just a lot of brown leaves where the dieback has occurred …

Image: “Rain Making 21: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 21: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And also the bark looks unusual to me. You see, healthy bark of a manzanita shrub or chaparral tree looks smooth like this bark here …

Image: “Rain Making 22: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 22: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

But what we saw on the trail yesterday was a lot of bark that looked almost blistered, like this …

Image: “Rain Making 23: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 23: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

You see those blisters on the bark there? We saw whole trees with blistered bark like that. I think that is a response to lack of water and stress …

Image: “Rain Making 24: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 24: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Now here is a very good one; a very fine specimen of manzanita …

Image: “Rain Making 25: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 25: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And you will see the way that the bark is, right now …

Image: “Rain Making 26: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 26: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

I will try to get a little closer up. See how it looks all blistered and stressed out? Look at that! First time I have ever seen it  …

Image: “Rain Making 27: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 27: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

See there? And also, farther up it seems to be peeling back. Look at that …

Image: “Rain Making 28: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 28: Manzanita (Arctostaphylos),” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

So this is what I am asking: That all these chaparral trees, the ‘elven forest’ of the Santa Monica Mountains …

Image: “Rain Making 29: Cold Creek Preserve Chaparral,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 29: Cold Creek Preserve Chaparral,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… should be completely healed, through appropriate water from the skies, and through the zephyrs of the air, and the beautiful water elementals as well ..

Image: “Rain Making 30: Cold Creek Preserve, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 30: Cold Creek Preserve, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

That the sylphs should blow the clouds where they need to be, and that the water elementals should make sure that the right amount of rain gets to the right place; that is my wish and my hope; and if each of you wish it with me, I am certain that is exactly what will happen here on planet Earth …

Image: “Rain Making 31,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 31,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… for all of Earth.

Image: “Rain Making 32: Yarrow,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making 32: Yarrow,” by Alice B. Clagett, 6 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

VIDEO BY ALICE: RAINMAKING 2
Filmed on 7 May 2016; published on 22 May 2016

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO

Image: “Rain Making.2-1: Datura,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-1: Datura,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-2: Datura and Honeybee,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-2: Datura and Honeybee,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Hello, Dear Ones, It’s Alice. I Am of the Stars.

I am here in my official rainmaking capacity. I was just down at the Chatsworth Nature Preserve and Reservoir, checking; and then I checked all the way up here to Sage Ranch Park in the Simi Hills. I checked on top of the mountain, and all along the way it had rained. Let me show you …

Here we are, at Sage Ranch Park, and you can see, off in the distance here, more rain clouds …

Image: “Rain Making.2-3: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-3: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Looks like the nature elementals are picking up water from the ocean which is over that way [zooms left] …

Image: “Rain Making.2-4: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-4: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and the zephyrs are carrying the water up to the clouds, [pans right] and making the clouds heavy with water …

Image: “Rain Making.2-5: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-5: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and then blowing them in the right direction. You see, right over there, on that mountain, right now, it is raining. See there? … right over there …

Image: “Rain Making.2-6: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-6: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And then if I look over this way, [pans left] I see the results of today’s rain on the ground. The ground is kind of wet; see there? Wet ground; look at that; way wet for this area. (This is a semi-arid area.) …

Image: “Rain Making.2-7: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-7: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And over here the rain poured down onto these rocks …

Image: “Rain Making.2-8: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-8: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and down into the parking lot, It has been this way all the way up here. I see mud puddles; down here was a little flood of rain …

Image: “Rain Making.2-9: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-9: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

As to the wild-growing fruit trees here, it looks like they will have enough rain for the time being …

Image: “Rain Making.2-10: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-10: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And I can feel that the nature spirits in this are are greatly heartened and hopeful …

Image: “Rain Making.2-11: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-11: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and that the plants themselves are feeling that the worst is over …

Image: “Rain Making.2-12: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-12: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and that there is hope for them to continue living here …

Image: “Rain Making.2-13: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-13: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and to be happy here in these mountains …

Image: “Rain Making.2-14: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-14: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

This is a wonderful feeling today. And there are the rain clouds up there. [pans upward] … Wow! …

Image: “Rain Making.2-15: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-15: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

. . . . .

Look here: Someone has left a stainless steel bowl on the ground, in the parking lot, that has accumulated water in it, from the rain. And that will be good for the coyotes that live right around here to drink tonight.

Image: “Rain Making.2-16: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-16: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

. . . . .

I am here by this big rock across from the parking lot, where I often see coyotes moving around and looking for gophers to eat …

Image: “Rain Making.2-17: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-17: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

There is this big mud puddle that went down this way, down the hill … just a lot of it …

Image: “Rain Making.2-18: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-18: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It probably came from way up there, on that hill [pans upward] …

Image: “Rain Making.2-19: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-19: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and coursed down through here, and on down the hill. Wow, I am very impressed! I really am! …

Image: “Rain Making.2-20: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-20: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… because if one person could wish for this, and then actually have it happen … or two people could, as was the case yesterday … then what would happen if ten people in Los Angeles decided to do this … especially men. Men are especially good at this kind of thing, because of the strength of their will power and the directness of their intention.

Image: “Rain Making.2-21: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.2-21: Sage Ranch Park,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

SIGNS OF RAINFALL AT CHATSWORTH NATURE PRESERVE

DSC02831

Image: “Rain Making.3-1: Chatsworth Nature Preserve,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.3-1: Chatsworth Nature Preserve,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

DSC02832

Image: “Rain Making.3-2: Chatsworth Nature Preserve,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.3-2: Chatsworth Nature Preserve,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

DSC02828

Image: “Rain Making.3-3: Chatsworth Nature Preserve,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.3-3: Chatsworth Nature Preserve,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

DSC02834

Image: “Rain Making.3-4: Chatsworth Nature Preserve,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Rain Making.3-4: Chatsworth Nature Preserve,” by Alice B. Clagett, 7 May 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

. . . . .

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

…………………..

Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

…………………………………………………….
…………………………………………………….

ascension, rainmaking, chaparral, manzanita, Sage Ranch, Chatsworth Reservoir, Stunt Road, Cold Creek Canyon Preserve, stressed chaparral, drought, Los Angeles, Chatsworth Nature Preserve, ceremony, nature elementals, zephyrs, sylphs, undines, Santa Susana Mountains, Native Americans, weather, Sierra Club, California Native Plant Society, Cold Creek Preserve, nature spirits, Red Rock Canyon Park, Pacific madrone, Ericaceae, manzanita, Arctostaphylos, elven forest, chaparral, photos by Alice, photo essay,

Hunting for the Common Crane Fly, and The Time of the Falling Grasses . by Alice B. Clagett

Filmed on 19 April 2016; published on 18 May 2016
Location: Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, California

  • VIDEO BY ALICE
  • SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO
    • Common Crane Fly (Tipula planicornis), Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, Spring 2016
  • VIDEO BY ALICE
  • SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO
    • The Time of the Falling Grasses, Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, Spring 2016
    • Golden Stars

Dear Ones,

These are two nature videos taken at Reagan Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains, 19 April 2016. There are Summaries after the videos. The first video has no words; and the second has just a few …

VIDEO BY ALICE
Filmed on 19 April 2016; published on 18 May 2016

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO

Common Crane Fly (Tipula planicornis), Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, Spring 2016

Image: “Habitat of Common Crane Fly (‘Tipula planicornis’),” Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Habitat of Common Crane Fly (‘Tipula planicornis’),” Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Common Crane Fly (‘Tipula planicornis’),” Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, Santa Monica Mountains, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Common Crane Fly (‘Tipula planicornis’),” Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, Santa Monica Mountains, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

VIDEO BY ALICE
Filmed on 19 April 2016; published on 18 May 2016

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO

The Time of the Falling Grasses, Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, Spring 2016

Oh, here I am; and it is the time of the falling grasses (or maybe wild oats?). Look at this, everywhere falling …

Image: “Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Oats, Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Oats, Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Proudly standing only a week or so ago. Soon they will be all golden.

Golden Stars

Image: “Golden Stars 1,” Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Golden Stars 1,” Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Golden Stars 2,” Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Golden Stars 2,” Reagan Ranch, Santa Monica Mountains, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 19 April 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

. . . . .

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars
…………………..

Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

…………………………………………………….
…………………………………………………….

nature, common crane fly, Tipula planicornis, grass, golden stars, Reagan Ranch, photos by Alice, photo essay,

Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains – Spring Equinox 2016 . by Alice B. Clagett *

Filmed on 20 March 2016; published on 15 April 2016

Words of Warning   .   Poison Oak   .  California Native Mustards   .   Black Sage   .   California (Coastal) Sagebrush … Cowboy Cologne   .   Chamise (Greasewood)

Wild Cucumber  .   Munits Cave   .   Purple (Deadly) Nightshade   .   White Nightshade (Solanum douglasii)   .  Filaree (Stork’s-Bill) 

Fiddlenecks   .   Horehound   .   Buckwheat   .   Prickly Pear   .   Western Scrub Jay (Island Scrub Jay)   .   Bush Sunflower (California Encelia)   .   Laurel Sumac   .   Purple Sage

White Sage   .   Semi-Riparian Zone  .   California Mugwort   .   Deerweed   .   Oak Woodland   .
Coastal Live Oak   .   California Sycamore   .   Woodland Trail   .   Arroyo Willow?

Mule Fat   .   Black Mustard   .   Various Habitats   .   The San Fernando Valley in the Time of the Conquistadores   .   Wild Hyacinth (Blue Dick)   .   Monarch Butterfly

About the Spirits of Trees   .   Eucrypta (Hideseeds)   .   More California Native Mustards   .   California (Mexican) Elderberry   .   Cheeseweed (a Mallow)   .   Live Oats 


Dear Ones,

This is a video about wild plants of the Santa Monica Mountains that was taken on 20 March 2016, the day of the 2016 Spring Equinox, in the Santa Monica Mountains …

There is an edited Summary after the video. The Summary includes many images found in the video, and a few not found there …

VIDEO BY ALICE         top

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO         top

Words of Warning         top
Please do not take my word as to whether these wild plants are edible … In many cases, I just heard it from other naturalists. Do your research, make sure you have identified a plant accurately, make sure most folks agree that it is edible, and then if you are sampling for the first time, try just a tiny bit, and wait a day to see if you have any reaction. Any iteration of this blog must include this warning. –Alice B. Clagett

Hello, Dear Ones, It’s Alice. I Am of the Stars.

We are going for a botanical walk in the Santa Monica Mountains today. We will see what we find here, on this beautiful Spring day.


Poison Oak         top

Here we have a beautiful Spring bloom of poison oak. So for those that are allergic to it, here is what it looks like, with berries …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 1: Poison Oak Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 1: Poison Oak Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Pretty, is it not? Poison oak is a relative of poison ivy, which is on the East Coast. But poison oak grows into a bush, and poison ivy is a climbing vine that climbs up the East Coast.

While most Caucasian people seem to be allergic to poison oak and poison ivy, the Native Americans had a number of uses for it, including using the pliable stems of the poison oak …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 2: Poison Oak Vines,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 2: Poison Oak Vines,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… as basket weaving materials.

This is poison oak, growing in a tremendous amount, all along here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 3: Poison Oak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 3: Poison Oak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

You have to be very careful, on this trail, not to hit the poison oak!

Poison Oak: Native American uses … Link: “Native American Uses,” in Cal Poly Land … 
http://polyland.calpoly.edu/topics/florafauna/studentsites/2004b/native.html ..

Link: “Toxicodendron diversilobum,” in Wikipedia …   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxicodendron_diversilobum ..


California Native Mustards         top

I am pretty sure that this is a California native mustard here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 4: California Native Mustard,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 4: California Native Mustard,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

They grow singly; not like the ones introduced by the Padres. They grow singly, and in odd ecological niches. Ups, here is another one over here … where is it? … right over here is another one. And oh, I see some more … yes, some more, just coming up, So under this native coastal live oak tree here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 5: Coastal Live Oak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 5: Coastal Live Oak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… there are a number of them. It is a very small econiche. It is not like the open field is full of mustard seeds that the Padres brought. But it is beautiful in its own way … very dainty, very nice … somewhat hard to find. There are a number of California native mustard species or types like this. While they are edible, they are endangered, so it is best to leave them alone, with the hope that they may flourish in future.


Black Sage         top

This is black sage here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 6: Black Sage,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 6: Black Sage,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It has a wonderful healing quality. I just brushed against it, on my way up this trail, and I smelled it.

Black Sage uses … Link: “Salvia mellifera,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvia_mellifera ..


California (Coastal) Sagebrush … Cowboy Cologne         top

And over here, on this side, is Cowboy Cologne …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 7: California (Coastal) Sagebrush (Cowboy Cologne),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 7: California (Coastal) Sagebrush (Cowboy Cologne),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It has a gentler scent, a beautiful scent, and they say that the cowboys used to use it before they would go in town on a Friday or Saturday night.

California (Coastal) Sagebrush (Cowboy Cologne) uses … Link: “Artemisia californica,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_californica ..


Chamise (Greasewood)         top

And this over here is chamise or greasewood …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 8: Chamise (Greasewood),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 8: Chamise (Greasewood),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It does not have that much of a scent at all.

Chamise or Greasewood: Native American uses … Link: “Adenostoma fasciculatum,” in Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) …  http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/shrub/adefas/all.html … Search the term: Other Uses and Values


Wild Cucumber         top

And over here is wild cucumber …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 9: Wild Cucumber,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 9: Wild Cucumber,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It has a very huge root. And I see it is too soon for the prickly fruits of the wild cucumber to come out. It is a vine, and it has holdfasts that are … let’s see if I can find one … very little whorls of circular or circles of holdfasts. Ok, there is one, reaching out into space …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 10: Wild Cucumber Holdfast,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 10: Wild Cucumber Holdfast,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It is trying to catch hold of a plant, so that it can pull the wild cucumber vine up higher into the sunlight. It climbs like crazy in the early Spring, and then it just withers away, and survives by means of the huge root underground.

Wild Cucumber: Native American uses … Link: “Wild Cucumber, Marah macrocarpa,” in Nature Collective … https://www.sanelijo.org/plant-guide/wild-cucumber ..


Munits Cave         top

Up that hill, up that way …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 11: Mountain Near Castle Peak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 11: Mountain Near Castle Peak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… there is a very cool cave, or series of caves …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 12: Munits Cave,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 12: Munits Cave,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

There are birds that hide out in there too; and people climb around in there, just for fun.

Link: “Cave of Munits in Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve & Castle Peak in El Escorpion Park,” in Hikespeak … https://www.hikespeak.com/trails/cave-of-munits-castle-peak-hike/ ..


Purple (Deadly) Nightshade         top

This is deadly nightshade here … see the purple flowers? …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 13: Purple (Deadly) Nightshade,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 13: Purple (Deadly) Nightshade,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

This variety of nightshade … the one with the purple flowers … has fruits that are not edible. Here is the fruit of the purple, or deadly, nightshade …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 14: Purple (Deadly) Nightshade Fruits,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 14: Purple (Deadly) Nightshade Fruits,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It is a very small, immature fruit, but as I recall, it comes out green when mature, and so it is distinguished from the mature fruit of the white nightshade, which is purple, Fruit is mature when it is soft or squishy.

There are nightshade references at the end of the “White Nightshade” section below.


White Nightshade         top

There is another nightshade, white nightshade (Solanum douglasii), that has black fruit; I heard from a naturalist that the black fruit were edible, but after trying one of the berries, I feel a little queasy. So I would advise caution in trying even the white nightshade fruit.

For those who are allergic to tomatoes, eggplants, or potatoes, which I understand to be in the same family, common sense dictates avoiding the fruit of the white nightshade.

Nightshades are a little like mushrooms: Only those who are certain what variety they have in hand ought collect them for consumption. This link is a good guide to the various nightshades of California …

Link: “Solanum,” in Calflora …  https://www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/specieslist.cgi?where-genus=Solanum ..

Nightshade uses … Link: “Solanaceae,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanaceae ..


Filaree (Stork’s-Bill)         top

This is filaree here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 15: Filaree (Stork’s-Bill),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 15: Filaree (Stork’s-Bill),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

There are several forms of filaree; all of them are edible. I think you have to cook them for a while, till tender. And here are the immature seed pods of filaree; very distinctive …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 16: Filaree (Stork’s-Bill) Seed Pod 1,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 16: Filaree (Stork’s-Bill) Seed Pod 1,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… very distinctive. More filaree seed pods here; see that one? …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 17: Filaree (Stork’s-Bill) Seed Pod 2,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 17: Filaree (Stork’s-Bill) Seed Pod 2,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

I do not think you can eat the seed pods.

Filaree (‘stork’s-bill’) uses … Link: “Erodium cicutarium,” in Wikipedia …   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erodium_cicutarium#Uses ..


Fiddlenecks         top

These are fiddlenecks, that grow all over the hills here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 18: Fiddleneck,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 18: Fiddleneck,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… not too showy, but if you look at them up close, they are very pretty.

Fiddleneck: In one place read that this plant is poisonous, and in another that it had Native American uses. I would steer clear of it entirely.

LInk: “Amsinckia,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amsinckia ..


Horehound         top

This if horehound, here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 19: Horehound,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 19: Horehound,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It is used in candies. It was brought here by the Puritans long ago, and it spread all over the United States. It is an extremely hardy plant. You see how it looks a little bit white (or ‘hoary’ … that is the old name) …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 20: Horehound, Whitish Leaves and Stems,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 20: Horehound, Whitish Leaves and Stems,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And it has white stems too.

Horehound uses … Link: “White Horehound; Uses,” in WebMD … https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-886/white-horehound .. 

Link: “Marrabium vulgare,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marrubium_vulgare ..


Buckwheat         top

This is buckwheat …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 21: Buckwheat,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 21: Buckwheat,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It is just coming up; there are not any seeds yet. The fruit seeds are edible. Like the cereal grains, they were a staple of diet amongst the Native Americans that once lived here. There are several different kinds of buckwheat growing in the Santa Monica Mountains.

Buckwheat uses: Link: “Erigonum fasciculatum,” in Wikipedia …  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eriogonum_fasciculatum ..


Prickly Pear         top

This is a native cactus …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 22: Prickly Pear,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 22: Prickly Pear,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It bears fruit that are edible, and delicious, and often harvested by Latin Americans and Native Americans. If the spines are burnt off of the leaves, then they can be sliced to the size of string beans, cooked, and eaten.

Prickly Pear uses … Link: “Prickly Pear” in Drugs.com … http://www.drugs.com/npp/prickly-pear.html ..

LInk: “Opuntia,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opuntia ..


Western Scrub Jay (Island Scrub Jay)         top

This is a Western Scrub Jay …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 23: Western Scrub Jay,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 23: Western Scrub Jay,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Looks pretty rambunctious to me.

I think this may be what is now termed the Island Scrub Jay; see … Link: “Western Scrub Jay,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_scrub_jay ..


Bush Sunflower (California Encelia)         top

This is a very common type of sunflower here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 24: Bush Sunflower (aka California Encelia),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 24: Bush Sunflower (aka California Encelia),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

You will notice the dark-colored centers of the flowers …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 25: Bush Sunflower (aka California Encelia) Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 25: Bush Sunflower (aka California Encelia) Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

As far as I know, it is not edible.

Bush Sunflower (California Encelia): sometimes used for landscaping …

Link: “Bush Sunflower, Encelia californica,” in California Native Plant Society Calscape … https://calscape.org/Encelia-californica-(Bush-Sunflower) ..


Laurel Sumac         top

This is laurel sumac …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 26: Laurel Sumac,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 26: Laurel Sumac,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It is a chaparral plant. It can be distinguished from other similar chaparral plants by the reddish colored stems; see there? …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 27: Laurel Sumac Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 27: Laurel Sumac Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It has a seed cluster (sumac ‘drupe’ or ‘bob’) that looks like a dusky, red Christmas tree. The birds eat it. I heard from my mother that it is poisonous, but I think in the Orient that this, or some relative of it, is used as a spice. So that is something to look into, for the future, without actually consuming it in advance of the research. [The spice I had in mind is Ziyad Brand Sumac, but whether this is the same or a different plant, I have no idea.]

Laurel Sumac uses … Link: “Malosma,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malosma ..


Purple Sage         top

I believe this to be purple sage …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 28: Purple Sage,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 28: Purple Sage,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

You will see that the leaves look a lot like the leaves of black sage, but they have a whitish cast to them …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 29: Purple Sage Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 29: Purple Sage Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And also, if you look closely, you will see that the leaves have a kind of a corrugation them …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 30: Purple Sage Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 30: Purple Sage Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

They smell absolutely delightful. They also have medicinal qualities, but the scent is not as ‘dark’ or strong as the scent of black sage (which has blue flowers). The purple sage have purple flowers, and the leaves look white.

Purple Sage uses … Link: “Chino Hills State Park Interpretive Association,” in Chino Hills State Park …  http://www.chinohillsstatepark.org/natural-resources/shrubs … Search the term: Purple Sage

Link: “Salvia leucophylla,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvia_leucophylla ..


White Sage         top

I doubt we will see any white sage on this walk. White sage has straight, white stems, and it is gathered … usually illegally … by people who sell it in bundles for incense to purify or cleanse people’s homes. You will see six-inch or eight-inch stacks of it, tied with yarn or string, and sold in the stores, and typically it is gathered nearby, rather than out in the National Forests, where, as i recall, it may be legal to gather it.

So I would like to ask, on behalf of the conservancy organizations: Please do not gather wild plants in the National Parks or the Santa Monica Mountains or like that … places where it so easy to gather, and where things can become endangered if you, in fact, do that. This is just a plea and an explanation. I am hoping for the best, there.

White Sage uses … Link: “Chino Hills State Park Interpretive Association,” in Chino Hills State Park …  http://www.chinohillsstatepark.org/natural-resources/shrubs … Search the term: White Sage

Link: “Salvia apiana,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvia_apiana ..


Semi-Riparian Zone         top

Here we have a semi-riparian zone …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 31: Semi-Riparian Zone,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 31: Semi-Riparian Zone,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

After the rains, I think there is water; and then, I think, sometimes there is not. You can find special plants, with special medicinal qualities, in riparian areas. This one is no exception.


California Mugwort         top

Here we have California mugwort …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 32: California Mugwort,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 32: California Mugwort,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… which has so many uses, I must look them all up! But I will tell you one colorful example: They say that if you gather mugwort, which grows plentifully in some areas, and dry it, and put it inside your pillow, then you will have special dreams.

I tried this myself; and because I was not all that fond of the strong odor of the mugwort, my dreams were not all that pleasant. But you may have better luck than I.

The other thing I know about mugwort: To my mind, ‘wort’ means ‘plant’ and ‘mug’, to me, means that you make tea out of it, and put it in a mug. That is how I think of it. And so I remember that a tea of this is good for women. It solves various troubles that can be looked up, and brings balance to the female system. There may be other uses too.

California Mugwort uses … Link: “Artemisia douglasiana,” in Wikipedia …  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_douglasiana#Uses ..


Deerweed         top

This is deerweed …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 33; Deerweed,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 33; Deerweed,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Sometimes it goes dormant, when the weather is very hot. But right now it is flourishing. It has tiny, beautiful, yellow (and sometimes orange) flowers …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 34: Deerweed Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 34: Deerweed Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

And as far as I know, it has no special benefit for people; but it is beautiful when all the flowers bloom (which they are no doing right now).

Deerweed uses … Link: “Deerweed,” in Nature Collective … https://www.sanelijo.org/plant-guide/deerweed ..

Link: “Acmispon glaber,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acmispon_glaber ..


Oak Woodland         top

Here I am, walking into an oak woodland …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 35: Woodland,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 35: Woodland,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… completely different from riparian; and very beautiful! I am sure you know about … here …


Coastal Live Oak         top

Here are lots of acorns left over from last year’s season …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 36: Acorns,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 36: Acorns,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Native Americans would gather them, haul them, mash them up, net them, put them in running water, in a stream or like that, in the wintertime, to get the bitter tannin out of them, and then mash them up more, and use them as flour in their foods.

And because they mashed them in stone hollows, with stones, the acorn meal was mixed up with sands from the stone, it was mixed in with the food that they ate, and it wore down their teeth at a very early age. It is better to use some other kind of mashing technique, I feel.

Here are the leaves of the tree that produces the acorns …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 37: Coastal Live Oak Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 37: Coastal Live Oak Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

You can see they are very shiny and they are curved round. I have heard from people who go on hikes and lead hikes, that the leaves are curved so that they can conserve moisture better, in the drought season of summer. See here? … curved …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 38: Coastal Live Oak Leaves – Curved,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 38: Coastal Live Oak Leaves – Curved,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

The new leaves are soft; but the old leaves are very hard. They have little prickles on them, that make it hard for the deer, for instance, to eat them … even though the deer might be very hungry. And this shiny stuff here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 39: Coastal Live Oak Leaves – Prickled and Shiny,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 39: Coastal Live Oak Leaves – Prickled and Shiny,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… probably acts as protection against the heat in the summertime.

Coastal Live Oak uses … Link: “Quercus agrifolia,” in Wikipedia …  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_agrifolia ..


California Sycamore         top

This is the native California Sycamore tree, one of the most beautiful trees in the world, I feel …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 40: Sycamore,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 40: Sycamore,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

I just love Sycamore trees. They do not have any particular use. They provide shade; they like water; and they are beautiful.

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 41: Sycamore Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 41: Sycamore Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Link: “Platanus racemosa,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platanus_racemosa ..


Woodland Trail         top

A woodland trail, continuing; different kinds of plants here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 42: Woodland Trail,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 42: Woodland Trail,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0


Arroyo Willow?         top

I sort of thought, because of the riparian area right next to it, that maybe this is some kind of willow tree. But I just do not know …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 43: Might Be Arroyo Willow,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 43: Might Be Arroyo Willow,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It is not that willow chaparral shrub. There are the leaves right there …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 44: Might Be Arroyo Willow Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 44: Might Be Arroyo Willow Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Is this arroyo willow? If so, then perhaps the bark of this willow, like that of other willow trees, might be boiled for a tea that has an effect like that of aspirin. There is more on the uses of Arroyo willow at these links …

Arroyo Willow uses … Link: “Arroyo Willow (Salix lasiolepsis),” in Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy … https://www.parksconservancy.org/conservation/arroyo-willow ..


Mule Fat         top

Down in the hollow here, in the riparian area, with very straight sticks for stems, is a kind of chaparral plant called mule fat …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 45: Mule Fat,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 45: Mule Fat,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

. I guess that mules would eat it, when the earlier settlers came through here; and that is why they called it mule fat.

I will bet that, what with these very straight, strong stems that are tough, too …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 46: Mule Fat Stems,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 46: Mule Fat Stems,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… that the wood of this mule fat might have been used for arrows; probably arrows and not bows, because it does not get that big. Here is a closeup of the top part of the plant …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 47: Mule Fat Flowers,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 47: Mule Fat Flowers,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Mule Fat uses … Link: “Baccharis salicifolia,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baccharis_salicifolia ..


Black Mustard         top

This is a young, black mustard plant …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 48: Black Mustard,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 48: Black Mustard,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It is very tasty when it is young like this. You can eat the leaves, especially if they are smaller than this, but even now, raw in salads. Black mustard has a very strong taste to it, and it is good as flavoring, to go with you milder greens. This here is the beginning of the flowers …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 49: Black Mustard Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 49: Black Mustard Leaves,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It is delicious before it flowers, and it is delicious after it flowers as well …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 50: Black Mustard Flower,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 50: Black Mustard Flower,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Yes, a really tasty plant. Do not eat too much at one time; use it for flavoring, I say. Otherwise it might have too strong an effect.

Black Mustard uses … Link: Brassica nigra,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brassica_nigra ..


Various Habitats         top

This is a combination right here … down at the very bottom you have a riparian zone

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 51: Riparian Zone,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 51: Riparian Zone,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and then up above it you have meadowland up here ….

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 52: Meadowland,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 52: Meadowland,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and then looking over this way, woodland …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 53: Woodland,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 53: Woodland,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0


The San Fernando Valley in the Time of the Conquistadores         top

They say that, in the time of the Conquistadores … when they came through here … that all the San Fernando Valley was covered with live oak trees. There was no chaparral to speak of, here. And the Conquistadores could come riding under the cover of the great oak trees all day long, in the San Fernando Valley. It was like a beautiful parkland then.

The terrain has really changed since then, what with the grazing, and the cutting down of the trees, and so forth.


Wild Hyacinth (Blue Dick)         top

This is a kind of lily; I think it might have a bulbar base in the ground, which is said to be edible but protected, so ought not be harvested …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 54: Wild Hyacinth (Blue) and Fiddleneck (Yellow),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 54: Wild Hyacinth (Blue) and Fiddleneck (Yellow),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

I am referring to these blue flowers …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 55: Wild Hyacinth (Blue Dick),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 55: Wild Hyacinth (Blue Dick),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and not the fiddlenecks …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 56: Fiddleneck,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 56: Fiddleneck,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

The blue flowers are sometimes called Blue Dicks. Probably somebody’s favorite friend was named ‘Dick”, and the person named the flower after them. And they are sometimes called ‘wild hyacinth. I really love that ‘wild hyacinth’ name; I think it is beautiful. And the flowers are beautiful too … evanescent; only here for a little while, during the year.

Wild Hyacinth (Blue Dick) uses … Link: “Dichelostemma capitalus,” in Wikipedia …  http://mojavedesert.net/wildflower/blue-dicks.html ..


Monarch Butterfly         top

Ah, did that come through? That was a monarch butterfly …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 57: Monarch Butterfly,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 57: Monarch Butterfly,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

I do not know what it was attracted to, down here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 58: Where Monarch Butterfly Was Flying,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 58: Where Monarch Butterfly Was Flying,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Maybe it does not know either! It is going off, looking for something.

Link: “Monarch Butterfly,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarch_butterfly ..


About the Spirits of Trees         top

I really like this beautiful live oak here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 59: Favorite Coastal Live Oak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 59: Favorite Coastal Live Oak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

I come and visit it every once in a while. I think it is courageous, especially considering how much graffiti the young folks have put on here. I assume it is the young folks, but I might be mistaken about that … 

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 60: Coastal Life Oak Graffiti,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 60: Coastal Life Oak Graffiti,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

This poor tree! Do they not know the bark is very important to the life of the tree? I guess they do not. Well, I have talked about this before. I can understand that young people want to make their mark on the world. But the thing of it is, these are living, ancient trees …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 61: Coastal Live Oak Shelters Many Beings,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 61: Coastal Live Oak Shelters Many Beings,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… wise in their own way … and harboring great forms of life … not only physical forms of life like birds and insects and mammals and reptiles … but other, nonphysical forms of life as well. There are nature spirits living here.

That, way up there …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 62: Owl Stand on Coastal Live Oak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 62: Owl Stand on Coastal Live Oak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… I think was a platform for a bird once. It looks as if it has fallen a little sideways with time. Here is the other side of the tree …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 63: Coastal Live Oak Canopy 1,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 63: Coastal Live Oak Canopy 1,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… which goes on …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 64: Coastal Live Oak Canopy 2,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 64: Coastal Live Oak Canopy 2,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and on … Absolutely beautiful!

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 65: Coastal Live Oak Canopy 3,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 65: Coastal Live Oak Canopy 3,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0


Eucrypta (Hideseeds)         top

This is a beautiful little plant that has delicate, fernlike leaves and very tiny … see how tiny? …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 66: Eucrypta (Hideseeds) Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 66: Eucrypta (Hideseeds) Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… flowers. A lot of people do not like this plant, but I have always found it very beautiful, brightening up the forest floor in the early springtime …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 67: Eucrypta (Hideseeds),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 67: Eucrypta (Hideseeds),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… very delicate, beautiful flowers.

Link: “Eucrypta,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucrypta ..


More California Native Mustards         top

Here are more California native mustards, growing in the shade of an oak tree …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 68: California Native Mustards,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 68: California Native Mustards,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0


California (Mexican) Elderberry         top

Here is California (Mexican) elderberry. It is a small tree, out here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 69: California (Mexican) Elderberry,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 69: California (Mexican) Elderberry,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and these are the flowers here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 70: California (Mexican) Elderberry Flowers,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 70: California (Mexican) Elderberry Flowers,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… very showy this time of year. I think you can eat the flowers (or maybe the berries) in pancakes. But you have to take some parts off, so it is important to read up on this before attempting a recipe with it. Parts of this are edible, but only if prepared in certain ways, and maybe only in limited quantities.

California (Mexican) Elderberry uses … Link: “Sambucus nigra,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sambucus_nigra ..


Cheeseweed (a Mallow)         top

This is cheeseweed (a mallow) here …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 71: Cheeseweed (a Mallow),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 71: Cheeseweed (a Mallow),” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

It has a tiny, not showy flower … It is hard to find this little, white flower …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 72: Cheeseweed Flower,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 72: Cheeseweed Flower,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

… and then it has a seed or fruit that comes in four parts, like a round of cheese, and the seed is edible … tasty too; fairly tasty.

Cheeseweed (a Mallow) uses … Link: “Mallow (Malva parviflora) an Edible Friend,” in Root Simple … https://www.rootsimple.com/2008/02/mallow-malva-parviflora-an-edible-friend/ ..


Live Oats         top

These are live oats, an invasive grass in California …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 73: Live Oats,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 73: Live Oats,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

These are a little stunted. Sometimes they grow very, very tall. The seeds are edible …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 74: Live Oats Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 74: Live Oats Closeup,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

You have to be very careful to take them out of their green sheath. Or you can wait until the seeds are mature and hard, and then you can grind them up and use them in your food. It is very important to get the sheaths off though, because they can stick in your throat and feel funny.

Live oats … whole fields full of them! There are some of them up there, across the road. These are all live oats …

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 75: Live Oats Afar,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 75: Live Oats Afar,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Wild Oat uses … Link: “Avena,” in Wikipedia … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avena ..

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 76: Castle Peak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Wild Plants of the Santa Monica Mountains 76: Castle Peak,” by Alice B. Clagett, 20 March 2016, CC BY-SA 4.0


EDIBLE AND USEFUL PLANTS OF THE SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS         top

Citation: “Edible and Useful Plants of California,’ [with recipes] by Charlotte Bringle Clarke, 1977, University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles, California.

Citation: “Peterson Field Guides: Western Medicinal Plants and Herbs,” by Steven Foster and Christopher Hobbs, 2002, published by Houghton Mifflin Books.

Citation: “Early Uses of California Plants,” by Edward K. Balls, 1962, University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles, California.

Link: “Native American Usage of Plants Found in Fallbrook (Shrubs, Vines, Wildflowers),” Copyright © 2000 by Elizabeth Yamaguchi … http://tchester.org/fb/plants/na_uses.html ..


SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CLASSES IN NATIVE AMERICAN SKILLS         top

Link: “Earth Skills,” 1113 Cougar Court, Frazier Park, CA 93225, class descriptions …  http://www.earthskills.com/class-descriptions.html ..


RESOURCES FOR SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS PLANT IDENTIFICATION         top

Link: “Wildflowers of Southern California: A Photographic Gallery,” by Barbara J. Collins, Ph.D., California Lutheran University, Thousand Oaks, California 91360 …  https://earth.callutheran.edu/Academic_Programs/Departments/Biology/Wildflowers/index.htm ..

Citation: “Wildflowers of the Santa Monica Mountains,” by Milt McAuley, photography by James P. Kenney, 1985, Canyon Publishing Co., 8561 Eatough Avenue, Canoga Park, CA 91304.

Citation: “Flowering Plants: The Santa Monica Mountains, Coastal & Chaparral Regions of Southern California,” text by Nancy Dale, photography by members of the California Native Plant Society, 1986, Capra Press, PO Box 2068, Santa Barbara, CA 93120 in cooperation with the California Native Plant Society.

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Signs in the Clouds: Bird Looking Backwards . by Alice B. Clagett

Filmed on 3 November 2015; published on 8 November 2015

  • VIDEO BY ALICE
  • SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO
    • Postlude: Music of Chris Zabriskie and Images of a Colorado Autumn Day

Dear Ones,

Here is a cloud reading: a bird looking backwards. The Postlude at the end of the video features the music of Chris Zabriskie and images of a Colorado autumn day. There is an edited Summary after the video …

VIDEO BY ALICE

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO

Look at this, Dear Ones … It is a cloud that looks like a bird, with its head turned ’round backwards, like it is looking behind it. Is not that interesting?

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 1A: The Bird,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 1A: The Bird,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 1B: The Bird,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 1B: The Bird,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

I thought about it for a few minutes … this idea of a bird with its head turned ’round, looking backwards, and what I came up with for this cloud reading is that we are flying … flying into the New Beginning.

And yet, what with all the astral stories and so forth, spinning around and carrying on, it is almost like getting a glimpse of an old movie from a long time ago … bunches and bunches of them … and of the way things used to be, you know? It is like a review of the things that are going away.

And so, we are like that bird that is taking off, into the sky. Just for a minute or two, when an astral story rolls around, we are looking backwards, at the way things used to be, and all of the things that are just clearing out of the stratosphere and the noosphere right now.

Look at this, Dear Ones! This is only a couple of minutes later, and the winds are so great … everything is changing so fast … this is what happened to the bird …

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 2A: The Bird Taking Off,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 2A: The Bird Taking Off,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 2B: The Bird Taking Off,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 2B: The Bird Taking Off,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

See, that is where the feet are taking off from Earth … right there, see? …

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 3A: The Bird’s Feet,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 3A: The Bird’s Feet,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 3B: The Bird’s Feet,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 3B: The Bird’s Feet,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

And up here, the body of the bird has become just gigantic! …

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 4A: The Bird’s Body,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 4A: The Bird’s Body,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 4B: The Bird’s Body,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 4B: The Bird’s Body,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Here is the head … See, there is the eye right there …

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 5A: The Bird’s Head,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 5A: The Bird’s Head,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 5B: The Bird’s Head,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 5B: The Bird’s Head,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

And so, everything has changed; everything is new. And in the same way, our dreams for New Earth are taking off and changing, and transforming into something grand and wonderful. It is incredible, really, just incredible!

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 6: Bird Flying and Cirrocumulus Clouds,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 6: Bird Flying and Cirrocumulus Clouds,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

So this is interesting right here; it looks like the head of the bird is changing into something else. See the eye on the left? That is what used to be the eye of the backwards bird

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 7A: Morphing Head and Eye,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 7A: Morphing Head and Eye,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 7B: Morphing Head and Eye,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 7B: Morphing Head and Eye,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

And you can see different things; but right here, it looks like a wolf with its mouth open, coursing forward, moving forward. (Actually, the cloud is moving in the other direction.)  …

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 8A: Wolf,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 8A: Coursing Wolf,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 8B: Wolf,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 8B: Coursing Wolf,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

And from a bigger distance, it looks like a deer that is asleep, with its eye closed. And the rest of it looks like a little spot on its nose there, and a nostril up on the far right …

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 9A: Deer,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 9A: Sleeping Deer,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 9B: Deer,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 9B: Sleeping Deer,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Interesting! I cannot make heads or tails of this. You are going to have to do it for me, and figure that out: Why would a bird that was looking backwards change into something that looks like a deer sleeping on the side of a mountain? That part is kind of peaceful …

And then within it, within the head of the deer, it has a wolf face, like a wolf that is moving forward so fast that its eyes are sort of half closed from the speed and the wind. Humm!

So maybe we have that it is ok to be moving forward very fast, and at the same time looking back … because the cloud is moving this way [pans left] … backwards. And maybe we also have that it is kind of hard to do what we are doing, because this wolf is making a great effort to move forward, and straight on, into the new … a great effort, and a kind of peace and oneness with nature … sleep, too, And the bird (from the first part of the cloud reading) has come to light over there, on top of the mountain. Huh!

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 10A: Deer and Wolf,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 10A: Deer and Wolf,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 10B: Deer and Wolf,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 10B: Deer and Wolf,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Well, so, a minute later, and it has all changed again …

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 11: Changed Cloud and Rays of Sun,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 11: Changed Cloud and Rays of Sun,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Right here I see a camel that is laughing, or a moose or horse that is laughing. Can you see it now? …

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 12A: Laughing Camel, Moose, or Horse,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image: “Backwards Bird Cloud 12A: Laughing Camel, Moose, or Horse,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 12B: Laughing Camel, Moose, or Horse,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

Image Markup: “Backwards Bird Cloud 12B: Laughing Camel, Moose, or Horse,” by Alice B. Clagett, 3 November 2015, CC BY-SA 4.0, from “Awakening with Planet Earth,” https://awakeningwithplanetearth.com .. 

So many different animals! It is as if all our animal ancestry is changing and converting and displaying itself and then morphing into something else as it disappears into the New Reality.

That is my thought on that topic. I wish you all a wonderful day, and a wonderful, new beginning in every moment. [waves]

Postlude: Music of Chris Zabriskie and Images of a Colorado Autumn Day

[The peaceful music that follows is “Prelude No. 17” from the album “Preludes” by Chris Zabriskie, CC by 4.0. It is accompanied by images of a Colorado autumn day.]

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars

The photos from the video are here … Link: “Colorado Autumn Day,” photos by Alice B. Clagett, Filmed on 3 November 2015 … https://wp.me/p2Rkym-bwV ..
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Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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ascension, clouds, prophecy, nature, New Beginning, astral stories, the past, looking back, noospheric clearing, New Earth, Gaia, animal ancestry, ancestral memories, feral instincts, Chris Zabriskie, Prelude No. 17, photo essay, photos by Alice,