Tag Archives: Oncopeltus fasciatus

Sound of Sunlight . by Alice B. Clagett

Filmed on 25 July 2020; published on 1 September 2020
Location: Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve

  • VIDEO BY ALICE
  • SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO
    • Photo by Alice

Dear Ones,

Here is a video about the sound of sunlight. There is an edited Summary after the video …

VIDEO BY ALICE

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO

Hello, Dear Ones, It’s Alice. I Am of the Stars.

There has been a slow-moving, Earth-directed CME (coronal mass ejection) impacting Earth’s magnetosphere today. I was out for a walk in the afternoon, in the hills. After awhile I sat down on a rock. And the left side of my head was in the direction of the sun that was falling down from high up in the sky, onto the left side of my head.

After awhile I started to hear the strangest sound, like dried bluebells singing in the wind. But it was coming from the top left side of my head. And then I realized it was the sound of the rays of sunlight coming down. I have never heard sunlight before.

I started to walk back. And then I tried standing with the right side of my head to the sun, to see if I could hear the tiny little dried bluebells sound singing in the right side of my head.

The sound continued in the left side of my head, as if the cells inside there were rejoicing with the sunlight. Then I began to hear it on the righthand side too. So it is sunlight singing today, through the coronal mass ejection.

I have a visual that reminds me a little of what I can hear right now. Here is some sort of sunflower, a very tall sunflower waving in the breeze. Beneath it there is a field of dried California oats that might be contributing to that sound I am hearing, because the wind is blowing through them.

Up at the top of the sunflower plant you can see three or four blossoms heading in different directions, blowing in the wind …

Image: “Bush Sunflower (Encelia californica), Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve, Simi Hills, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 July 2020, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Clutch of Nymphs of Large Milkweed Bugs (Oncopeltus fasciatus) on Narrow-leaved Milkweed, Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve, Simi Hills, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 July 2020, CC BY-SA 4.0

And if I zoom backward, there you can see the sunlight streaming down …

Image: “Sun and Bush Sunflower (Encelia californica), Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve, Simi Hills, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 July 2020, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Sun and Bush Sunflower (Encelia californica), Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve, Simi Hills, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 July 2020, CC BY-SA 4.0

The blossoms on the left and right side at the top there are like the places where I hear the sunlight singing inside my head, depending on what side is most turned towards the sun.

If I were the sunflower tree, then the one in back there would be the one that is singing the most, because it would be closest to the descending rays of sunlight.

Photo by Alice

Image: “Clutch of Nymphs of Large Milkweed Bugs (Oncopeltus fasciatus) on Narrow-leaved Milkweed, Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve, Simi Hills, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 July 2020, CC BY-SA 4.0

Image: “Bush Sunflower (Encelia californica), Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve, Simi Hills, California,” by Alice B. Clagett, 25 July 2020, CC BY-SA 4.0

. . . . .

In love, light and joy,
I Am of the Stars
…………………..

Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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photos by Alice, nature, insects, macrobiology, bush sunflower, Encelia californica, milkweed bugs, Oncopeltus fasciatus, narrow-leaved milkweed, incoming light, coronal mass ejection, solar events,